Joy Wolfram, Ph.D

Joy Wolfram, Ph.D

Nanotechnology—the study and application of extremely small things—has tremendous potential to revolutionize medicine, especially the treatment of cancers and other complex diseases that don’t respond well to conventional medications. Dr. Joy Wolfram and her team at the Mayo Clinic are at the forefront of this research, working to develop multi-functional nanoparticle-based cancer therapies. Joy likens these nanoparticles to tiny cars that can be loaded with several different drugs, navigated through the body, and then delivered directly to diseased tissues, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects. Joy’s vision is to develop innovative nanomedicines that bring the next generation of cancer treatments directly to the clinic.

Dr. Joy Wolfram is an Assistant Professor at Mayo Clinic in Florida, where she leads the Nanomedicine and Extracellular Vesicles Laboratory. She also holds affiliate faculty positions in the Department of Nanomedicine at the Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas, the Department of Biology at the University of North Florida, and the Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering in China. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology from the University of Helsinki in Finland. In 2016, she completed her Ph.D. in nanoscience and technology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In the past five years, she has authored over 40 publications and received more than 25 scientific awards from seven different countries. She was included in the Amgen Scholars Ten to Watch List, which highlights the best and brightest up-and-comers in science and medicine across 42 countries. Native of Finland, she was also selected as one of 12 internationally accomplished Finns, alongside Nobel laureates. She is  a board member and scientific advisor of several companies around the world with a cumulative customer base of over 18 million. She has designed several preclinical nanoparticles for the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. Her goal is to develop innovative nanomedicines that bring the next generation of cancer treatments directly to the clinic. Her mission is also to inspire and support underrepresented minorities in science. She is actively involved in community outreach and scientific education, including serving as the co-chair of the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network Education and Outreach Working Group of the National Cancer Institute in the United States.

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