Tracy Alloway

Tracy Alloway

The ubiquitous use of social media has caused many to fear that these personalized  technology platforms are creating a generation that is narcissistic and self-obsessed. But before we dismiss personalized technology as the perpetrator of our current societal ills, Professor Alloway argues that we must take a closer look at how social media can improve not only our memory of events, but also the way in which we observe our own lives and relate to those around us.

Tracy Packiam Alloway is a Psychology professor and Graduate Program Director at the University of North Florida. She was awarded an Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award (2015), as well as the Outstanding International Leadership Award (2014). She was also the recipient of the prestigious Joseph Lister Award (for outstanding skills in communicating to a non-specialist audience) from the British Science Association. Tracy’s research has contributed to the scientific understanding of working memory, and specifically in relation to education and learning needs. She has presented her research to national organizations such as the National Center for Learning Disabilities, and as well as internationally to organizations such as the Japanese Society for Developmental Psychology and the Center on Research on Individual Development and Adaptive Education of Children at Risk in Germany, among others. She also provided advice to the World Bank on the impact of memory and learning in deprived populations. In addition to over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, seven books, and two standardized test batteries on the topic of working memory, her work also has been featured on Good Morning America, the Today Show, Forbes, Bloomberg, The Washington PostNewsweek, and many others. She blogs for Psychology Today and The Huffington Post. Two of her books, Working Memory Advantage and Training Your Brain For Dummies, are available on Amazon.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.